Good Sam Camping Blog
TEST Header
Category: Holidays on the Road

The Truth Is Here: A Great Place to Crash as UFO Festival Invades Roswell

July 2, 2013 by · 1 Comment 

The Truth Is Here: A Great Place to Crash as UFO Festival Invades Roswell

“…In early July 1947, a mysterious object crashed on a ranch 30 miles north of Roswell” Well, at least my momma knows what species I am. As the story goes, sixty-six years ago, a rancher named W.W. Mack Brazel checked his sheep after a thunderstorm and found debris made of a strange metal scattered in many directions. He noticed a shallow trench several hundred feet long had been gorged into the desert landscape. Brazel said he was struck by the unusual properties of the debris and dragged large pieces of it to a shed. A day or two later, Brazel drove his rusty pickup down to the county seat of Roswell (New Mexico) and reported the incident to Chaves County Sheriff George Wilcox, who reported it to Maj. Jesse Marcel, intelligence officer for the 509th Bomb Group, stationed at Roswell Army Air Field (RAAF). In their book, A History of UFO Crashes, UFO researchers Don Schmitt and Kevin Randle say their research shows military radar had been tracking an unidentified flying object... [Read more...]

Outdoor Recreation as an Economic Engine

June 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Outdoor Recreation as an Economic Engine

Millions of Americans and Canadians take pleasure in the pursuit of enjoyment in the outdoors. Sabino Canyon is a natural desert oasis located in Tucson’s Coronado National Forest and is home to spectacular desert landscapes and abundant wildlife. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved But we rarely consider the economic impact of the outdoor recreation industry on local communities and the entire country. Newly released information from three separate and diverse studies provides a revealing look at the outdoor recreation industry as an economic engine that employs millions of Americans and Canadians and contributes billions of dollars to the economy. These studies were commissioned or conducted by the Outdoor Industry Association, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and the National Park Service. The Conservation Economy in America, commissioned by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and conducted by Southwick Associates, reports the economic impacts of direct investments into... [Read more...]

Ancient Desert Water Hole: Montezuma Well

June 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Ancient Desert Water Hole: Montezuma Well

Montezuma Well is a detached unit of Montezuma Castle National Monument located approximately 11 miles north of the park. It’s not actually a well and has nothing to do with Montezuma but being wrongly named doesn’t detract at all from its serene beauty. It’s NOT a well and Montezuma was never here! © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved This unique geological feature is a limestone sink formed long ago by the collapse of an immense underground cavern. This continuous flow of warm, fresh water has created a lush, verdant oasis in the middle of desert grassland. Such a reliable source of life-giving water has lured humans for thousands of years, although Montezuma was never one of them. Early settlers to the area believed that the exquisitely-preserved five-story cliff dwelling belonged to Aztec emperor Montezuma. In truth, the “castle” was built by the Sinagua and was deserted a century before Montezuma was born. Yet the name stuck to both the ruins and the beautiful pond which... [Read more...]

Top 5 Ways to Survive a Dust Storm

June 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Top 5 Ways to Survive a Dust Storm

A dust storm usually arrives suddenly in the form of an advancing wall of dust and debris which may be miles long and several thousand feet high. In a scene reminiscent of the 1930s Dust Bowl, on October 18, 2011, Lubbock, Texas went from light to dark in an instant, as the 8,000 foot dust cloud, traveling at a whizzing 70 mph, swept through. (Image via YouTube) Dust storms that turn day into night are a hazard to drivers. Dust storms can strike with little warning. Blinding, choking dust can quickly reduce visibility, causing accidents that may involve chain collisions, creating massive pileups. Dust Storms are among nature’s most violent and unpredictable phenomena. High winds lift dirt particles or, in the case of sandstorms, sand, into the air, unleashing a turbulent, suffocating cloud of particulates and reducing visibility to almost zero in a matter of seconds. Nearly all dust storms are capable of causing property damage, injuries, and deaths, and they can occur in any arid or... [Read more...]

Inscription Rock: El Morro National Monument

June 13, 2013 by · 2 Comments 

Inscription Rock: El Morro National Monument

“Paso por aqui, el adelantado Don Juan de Oñate, del descubrimiento de la mar del sur a 16 de Abril de 1605.” El Morro is Spanish for headland or bluff. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Translated, the inscription proclaims: “Passed by here, the expedition leader Don Juan de Oñate, from the discovery of the Sea of the South the 16th of April of 1605.” While Oñate’s inscription is the oldest Spanish carving found on El Morro, he was not the first Spaniard to see the mesa. In March 1583, Diego Pérez de Luxan, chronicler of an exploring expedition led by Antonio de Espejo, recorded in his journal that the party had camped at a location he called El Estanque de Peñol (The Place at the Great Rock). However, no record of the expedition’s passing has been found on the mesa. People had been carving messages on Inscription Rock in the high desert of northwestern New Mexico for centuries before de Oñate, the first Spanish Conquistador to organize a colony in New Mexico, came... [Read more...]

Joys of a Texas Bucket List

June 6, 2013 by · 2 Comments 

Joys of a Texas Bucket List

Texas is big and brawny in every way, a state brimming with natural assets. Whether visiting rugged mountains, sandy beaches, wild canyons, or the piney woods, the “Lone Star State” pleases travelers in a million wonderful ways. After leaving the pool, spring waters ebb slowly through the cattails, rushes and reeds of San Solomon Cienega. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Our Texas RV Travel Bucket List continues. Balmorhea State Park Balmorhea State Park is located on less than 50 acres in the foothills of the Davis Mountains. For thousands of years San Solomon Springs has provided a cool, wet respite for anyone who happened by this desert oasis. The pool as it now stands was built in the mid-1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and holds more than 3,500,000 gallons of clear spring water with a constant temperature of 72 to 76 degrees. The pool covers 1.75 acres and reaches depths of 25 feet, making it a mecca for desert-bound scuba divers. The huge pool is fed by the springs... [Read more...]

7 Tips for Planning a Successful Camping Trip

May 20, 2013 by · 2 Comments 

7 Tips for Planning a Successful Camping Trip

If you are going on a camping trip planning is essential. Camping at Arches National Park, Utah. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Whether you are a retired senior planning the trip of a lifetime, a snowbird, family looking for an economical way to vacation, or a couple looking to get away from the stresses of the work week, camping provides the perfect alternative to the conventional holiday. It also allows you to experience the fresh air that camping in the countryside offers and to meet new friends. But like any getaway, whether it’s for a weekend, a month, or an extended period, camping requires careful preparation to ensure all goes smoothly. When you think of what you’ll need for a road trip, a common list unfolds. Food, beverages, snacks, paper products, lawn chairs, maps, and GPS are all normal items you might bring along. Packing List The night before leaving on the camping trip will be less hectic if you plan ahead what to pack. Be careful not to over pack, take only... [Read more...]

Buying a Digital Camera: Remember the Cat and the Fox

May 6, 2013 by · 1 Comment 

Buying a Digital Camera: Remember the Cat and the Fox

Aesop’s fable, “the Fox and the Cat”, the fox boasts to the cat of its clever devices for escaping its enemies. No matter how technologically advanced a camera is, it still needs a photographer setting its dials, pressing its buttons, and pointing it at something interesting. Photo above is Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved “I have a whole bag of tricks,” he boasts, “which contains a hundred ways of escaping my enemies.” “I have only one,” said the cat. “But I can generally manage with that.” Just at that moment they heard the cry of a pack of hounds coming towards them, and the cat immediately scampered up a tree and hid herself in the boughs. “This is my plan,” said the cat. “What are you going to do?” The fox thought first of one way, then of another, and while he was debating, the hounds came nearer and nearer, and at last the fox in his confusion was caught up by the hounds and soon killed... [Read more...]

Victoria Day Week-end in Ontario

April 30, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Victoria Day Week-end in Ontario

If you are wondering what to do in May and you are near the border of Ontario, why not come and visit us on the Victoria Day long week-end? Victoria Day is a federal Canadian public holiday which is celebrated on the last Monday before the official birthday of Queen Victoria.    The holiday has been observes since before Canada was formed and originally on the sovereign’s actual birthday.    This year, the holiday is on May 20th which means that May 18-20 is our long week-end. But who is Queen Victoria? Queen Victoria – born Alexandrina Victoria on May 24th, 1819, was the monarch of the United Kingdom from June 20th, 1837 until her death on January 22nd, 1901.   Her reign lasted 63 years and seven month which is the long of any other British monarch and the longest of any female monarch in history.    The first official legislation passed in the parliament of the Province of Canada was to officially recognize May 24 as the Queen’s birthday.   Following her death in 1901,... [Read more...]

2.10 Carat Birthday Diamond Found at Crater of Diamonds

April 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

2.10 Carat Birthday Diamond Found at Crater of Diamonds

The diamond is the traditional birthstone for those who were born in the month of April. How perfect that Andrea Murphy of Gentry, Arkansas, found a 2.10-carat brown diamond while she and her family visited the Crater of Diamonds State Park last week to celebrate her birthday. According to Park Interpreter Margi Jenks, “Andrea and eight of her family members gathered together at the Crater of Diamonds to celebrate a milestone, her 30th birthday. Her mother, Karen, came up with the idea to visit Arkansas’s diamond site and celebrate the occasion here since the diamond is Andrea’s birthstone.” Jenks said, “The square, iced tea brown diamond was a surface find after Andrea had been here for about two hours. At first Andrea thought her find was either a diamond, or some kind of toy. After the park staff verified and registered her diamond, Andrea decided that the best name for it would be the Andrea Birthday Diamond.” The diamond is the 144th diamond found this year... [Read more...]

« Previous PageNext Page »