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Category: Holidays on the Road

The Truth About “Glamping”

September 5, 2014 by · 3 Comments 

The Truth About “Glamping”

The Truth About Glamping is…why not make yourself as comfortable as possible while camping?? Especially considering the rising nightly rates, outlandish gas prices, and the booked and sometimes overcrowded campgrounds? Quite honestly “Glamping” is the way to go! To look more into the phenomenon of “glamping,” we must first look at the definition and meaning behind the term itself.  According to the Urban Dictionary at http://www.urbandictionary.com, “Glamping” is defined as “Shorthand for glamorous camping; luxury camping.” So although it may have a bad connotation, it is actually just camping with a luxurious spin on it. Whether it means your RV is decked out like these unique ones or you simply wouldn’t consider camping in anything other than an RV, there is absolutely nothing wrong with “Glamping” despite the negative connotations surrounding this term. It is common for women, especially, to be known for glamping,... [Read more...]

Which Type of RVer Are You?

July 30, 2014 by · 13 Comments 

Which Type of RVer Are You?

Two RV Lifestyles There are many different ways to RV, but today we’re going to discuss two RV lifestyles. There are RV touring folks and there are RV destination campers.  RV destination campers go to a given destination for their entire vacation. Touring folks spend their time traveling from one location to another.  The latter group of “Rolling Stones” may feel they find it more adventurous to keep moving, spending only a night or two at each stop.  Many of them do not reserve a site, except an occasional same day phone call during busy times. Those people that choose to remain at one campsite for extended periods of time may have a larger family accompanying them.  Children, for example, get bored quickly while motor touring and would far prefer playing outside or perhaps swimming at a beach or on-site pool.  This method of RVing is generally less costly as you are not continually consuming fuel moving to the next site. These two types of RV campers gravitate naturally... [Read more...]

Where Cajun Began

April 20, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Where Cajun Began

As one of the oldest surviving towns in Louisiana, St. Martinville retains many buildings and homes reflecting the beautiful architecture of days gone by. Saint Martin of Tours Roman Catholic Church, founded 1765, Mother Church of the Acadians. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved St. Martinville has become symbolic of the Acadian legacy, holding sacred the history and legends of the Acadian people who settled in Louisiana. Bayou Teche, a waterway in south central Louisiana, meanders through St. Martinville, where birds wade among cattails, streets are shaded by century-old mossy oaks, and people enjoy fishing, picnics in the parks, and visits to historic museums. The St. Martinville people are descendants of Beausoleil Broussard, an Acadian hero from the 1700s, and Bienvenu and the Duchamp families of French royalty, who fled revolution. Descendants from Senegal also share life in St. Martinville, and many residents still speak French. These diverse ethnic groups host fun-loving Louisiana... [Read more...]

It’s Crawfish Season, Come Twist Some Tails with Us

March 29, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

It’s Crawfish Season, Come Twist Some Tails with Us

If you tour Cajun Country you’re bound to encounter crawfish. It’s as inevitable as BBQ in Texas, lobster in Maine, beans in Boston, or potatoes in Idaho. Between every row in a flooded rice field is a long line of traps with bright orange tops that poke out of the water every few feet. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Crawfish, mudbugs, crawdads, or crayfish—call them what you will—are woven into Cajun culture. They raise them, catch them, eat them, and sing about them. They even adopt them as the official state crustacean (July 1983). And for a critter that impacts the state economy to the tune of $120,000 million annually, the adulation seems about right. Crawfish are native to the Louisiana coast, where open water provides a perfect habitat for the crustaceans to burrow and grow. Rice has been a mainstay of Louisiana agriculture since the 18th century. It is one of the few crops the wet and silty soil is able to support. For years, crayfish was a wild product, harvested... [Read more...]

Luling: Texas Black Gold

March 18, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Luling: Texas Black Gold

Barbecue sauce isn’t the only valuable liquid flowing in Luling. The town is dotted with oil pumps that still move the Texas black gold from the ground. The Central Texas Oil Patch Museum pays tribute to the area’s oil industry. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Once known as “the toughest town in Texas”, Luling was established in 1874 as the far western stop of the Sunset Branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The developing importance of the town as a cattle-raising center, combined with the importance of the railroad as a shipping point, allowed the town to grow and prosper. Being the northern terminus of a freight road to Chihuahua, Mexico added to its stature. As the cattle drives to the railroad head decreased, Luling survived by turning to its rich soil and hardy folk. Luling came to be known throughout the region as an agriculture center with cotton, corn, and turkeys as its principal products. Cotton ruled the local economy until the momentous year of 1922. On... [Read more...]

Alabama Gulf Coast Named Top Tourism Attraction

March 4, 2014 by · 2 Comments 

Alabama Gulf Coast Named Top Tourism Attraction

Alabama’s Gulf beaches and Gulf State Park are the largest tourism attractions in the state, overwhelmingly so, according to the new attendance figures released last week by the Alabama Tourism Department. Sparkling turquoise Gulf waters and stunningly white sand await the RVer on the Alabama Gulf Coast. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved The state’s largest stand-alone festival events, located about 20 miles apart, are also located in the Gulf Coast region. The Fairhope Arts and Crafts Festival (March 14-16, in 2014) and National Shrimp Festival (October 9-12, in 2014) in Gulf Shores come in at the top two spots among event promotions staged over a single weekend. The relatively new Gulf Coast Hot Air Balloon Festival (June 13-14, in 2014), which takes place in between the other two in Foley, is also rising up the state’s annual top 10 festival list. According to the 2013 annual report, Mobile’s three-week long Mardi Gras celebration draws the largest attendance... [Read more...]

An Independence Day Must-See!

March 2, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

An Independence Day Must-See!

In a recent post, I have been talking about planning; planning your trips for next year, selecting campgrounds you want to visit and planning attractions you want to see.  This past fall, I also included a number of events and attractions for your consideration. But this post concerns an event in a place that everyone should experience, at least once in his or her life: the Arroyo Seco Fourth of July Parade. One kind soul brought hotdogs for everyone in the crowd! For those unfamiliar with it, Arroyo Seco is a small village on the way to the Taos Ski Valley in New Mexico. Known simply as “Seco” to locals, and boasting a mere 1,149 full time residents, the population swells to thousands each year on July 4th. I wrote a post detailing this picturesque village that published on September 8, 2013. But the time to visit Arroyo Seco is on the Fourth of July as it boasts a parade like no other event in this country. The NSA made their presence known as well! Locals and tourists alike begin... [Read more...]

Dance For a Chicken at a Cajun Country Mardi Gras

February 28, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Dance For a Chicken at a Cajun Country Mardi Gras

Mark Twain once wrote that a traveler “has not seen the United States until he has seen Mardi Gras in New Orleans.” On horseback and in flatbed trailers, participants and musicians sing, dance, and beg for chickens. (Credit: Terri Fensel) Of the thousands of festivals throughout the U.S. and Canada, none tops Mardi Gras. Spectacular parades, unbelievable costumes, music, dancing, food, drink­—take your pick of places to indulge and enjoy. The largest celebration occurs in New Orleans, but nearly every community from Pensacola, Florida, to Galveston, Texas, has its own version of the annual party. Wherever you go, you can find the style that best suits you, including tons of family-style celebrations. From rollicking Wrecks at Pensacola Beach to catching MoonPies in Mobile, communities all along the Gulf Coast have their own way of marking Mardi Gras season. The revelry in New Orleans tends to grab the spotlight, but how about dancing for a chicken at a Cajun Country Courir... [Read more...]

Mardi Gras Defined: Speak Like a Local

February 17, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Mardi Gras Defined: Speak Like a Local

It’s Mardi Gras time!   Mardi Gras. Two little words with an infinitely large explanation. For different people it’s different things—an event, an idea, a day, a way of life, piece of history, state holiday, or a million parades and countless memories. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Are you ready? There are a few terms you will hear throughout Mardi Gras. Familiarize these terms before you embark upon the revelry and you will understand everything going on around you and know how to converse like a true resident during Mardi Gras. Say What? Laissez les bon temps rouler — Let The Good Times Roll Carnivale — The carnivale season officially begins each year on January 6, the Feast of the Epiphany, ‘King’s Day’, with traditional balls occurring in the weeks that lead up to the big event. Mardi Gras — Fat Tuesday Lundi Gras — Fat Monday which is the day before the Mardi Gras holiday. Mardi Gras Colors — The traditional colors of Mardi Gras are purple, green, and gold.... [Read more...]

Valley of Fire State Park: Simply WOW!

February 12, 2014 by · 2 Comments 

Valley of Fire State Park: Simply WOW!

The lights! The glitz! The shine! Sculpted, chiseled, and twisted red rock formations more dramatic than most others we have seen dominate the park’s 42,000 acres. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved From the bizarre to the beautiful, Las Vegas has it all: New York, NY, The Venetian, Caesars Palace, and Paris—and the Bellagio water fountain show. When the neon of Vegas becomes too much, head out to Valley of Fire, Nevada’s first state park, so designated in 1935. With its blood-red sandstone cliffs and weird rock formations, there’s an other-worldly feeling here. Valley of Fire State Park is 55 miles—and a few light-years—northeast of Las Vegas via Interstate 15 and on exit 75. Sculpted, chiseled, and twisted red rock formations more dramatic than most others we have seen dominate the park’s 42,000 acres. We felt as though we had been transported to the alien surface another planet. The Valley of Fire derives its name from red sandstone formations, formed from great... [Read more...]

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