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Category: Other Great RV Routes

Sedona Named Top Destinations

March 30, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Sedona Named Top Destinations

Sedona, Arizona has been ranked as one of the Travelers’ Choice 2013 Top 25 Destinations in the United States. Located at the base of Oak Creek Canyon, another scenic destination, Sedona is renowned for its stunning rock formations such as Cathedral Rock. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Coming in at lucky 13, Sedona is pleased with the abundance of positive feedback and awe-inspiring reaction of both long time visitors and newcomers, according to Chamber news release. “Sedona is a true oasis, a vacationer’s paradise in the middle of the Arizona desert. Here, you’ll find resorts and spas, canyons and red rock formations,” said TripAdvisor. “Bell Rock and Oak Creek Canyon are great hiking spots, and the dramatic architecture of the Chapel of the Holy Cross is a religious experience itself. When the sun dips down below the horizon it introduces the best show in Sedona: the night sky.” “On behalf of the Sedona Chamber of Commerce & Tourism... [Read more...]

It’s Crawfish Season, Come Twist Some Tails with Us

March 29, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

It’s Crawfish Season, Come Twist Some Tails with Us

If you tour Cajun Country you’re bound to encounter crawfish. It’s as inevitable as BBQ in Texas, lobster in Maine, beans in Boston, or potatoes in Idaho. Between every row in a flooded rice field is a long line of traps with bright orange tops that poke out of the water every few feet. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Crawfish, mudbugs, crawdads, or crayfish—call them what you will—are woven into Cajun culture. They raise them, catch them, eat them, and sing about them. They even adopt them as the official state crustacean (July 1983). And for a critter that impacts the state economy to the tune of $120,000 million annually, the adulation seems about right. Crawfish are native to the Louisiana coast, where open water provides a perfect habitat for the crustaceans to burrow and grow. Rice has been a mainstay of Louisiana agriculture since the 18th century. It is one of the few crops the wet and silty soil is able to support. For years, crayfish was a wild product, harvested... [Read more...]

Click and Explore North America

March 15, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Click and Explore North America

Use Good Sam Camping’s Explore tool for travel itineraries, tourism info and great destinations in every state and province in North America. Select your destination on our handy interactive map and start planning your adventure today! From the Explore Tab home page, find your desired state or province on the interactive map and click (you can also choose a state from the list on the right-hand side). Each state/province page gives you three ways to learn about your destination: • The Welcome section provides an overview of the state you’re visiting. Learn about each state’s regions and get a sense of your destination’s climate and character. The Arizona Welcome section, for example, covers the state’s northern region, popular snowbird roosts and Native American heritage. • The RV Trip of a Lifetime section suggests itineraries to some of the most compelling attractions in each state and province. Check out great steaks along the Oklahoma leg of the Chisholm... [Read more...]

Czeching Out La Grange

January 29, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Czeching Out La Grange

We headed to the Central Texas town of La Grande to “Czech” out what might just be the “Best Little Day Trip in Texas.” Texas Quilt Museum © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved The events of La Grange’s famous Chicken Ranch inspired the stage play, movie, and the lyrics of a popular song, Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. Then there’s the ZZ Top song that still fuels Texas folklore. The brothel is no longer around—it was officially closed in 1973 after operating for more than 130 years. The building was sold and hauled to Dallas where, for awhile, it served as a restaurant that served—what else? Chicken. Later, the building burned to the ground. All that’s left these days is the legend and some fading memories. However, there’s still plenty to do in this town. For starters, we Czeched out the Texas Czech Heritage and Cultural Center. This museum gave us a feel for the culture and early days of Fayette County when thousands of Czech immigrants populated the area. The... [Read more...]

Good Times Happen in Kentucky

November 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Good Times Happen in Kentucky

Thousands of snowbirds pass through Kentucky every year and miss out on some of the most incredible natural wonders and cultural treasures anywhere. Kentucky Welcome Center, I-65, Exit 114 © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved From horse racing and Bourbon Country, to the culture of Appalachia, Civil War significance, and Abraham Lincoln, Kentucky is a state enriched with deep traditions, important history, and authentic heritage. Every mile we’ve traveled along the highways and byways of the Bluegrass State has led us to new discoveries: National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Mammoth Cave National Park in Cave Country, Grand Ole Opry of Kentucky in Renfro Valley, Cumberland Gap, Red River Gorge, Natural Bridge, folk arts and crafts in Berea, Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, horse farms, and Bourbon Country. Once an Indian hunting ground where Native American civilizations flourished as early as 13,000 years ago, Kentucky is bounded in the north by the great Ohio River and in the west... [Read more...]

Top 10 National Wildlife Refuges Scenic Drives

October 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Top 10 National Wildlife Refuges Scenic Drives

To really explore a national wildlife refuge, of course, you’ll want to get out of your vehicle. But when time is limited or you want to get the lay of the land before you set out on a trail, a scenic drive should be considered. For all us ‘let’s-check-it-out-first’ types, here’s a sampling of some super national wildlife refuge drives to whet your appetite for further exploration. 10. Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Michigan Photographers do a wonderful job at capturing the beauty of Seney National Wildlife Refuge. (Credit: fws.gov/Dawn Kopp) Seney National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1935 as a refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds and other wildlife. The refuge is located in the east-central portion of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, halfway between Lake Superior and Lake Michigan. A seven-mile ride along Marshland Wildlife Drive leads past wetlands and open water and through deciduous and coniferous forests in the Great Manistique Swamp, an old lumbering... [Read more...]

Mount Washington Traffic Increasing

July 27, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Mount Washington Traffic Increasing

New Hampshire’s Mount Washington has the reputation of being “Home of the world’s worst weather”. Originally called Agiocochook by native Americans, the mountain boasts some of the planet’s most severe weather, and retains the world record for wind speed, 231 mph © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Severe storms, including snow, can happen at any time of the year. The combination of severe winds, cold, and wetness can exhaust the strongest hiker. Mount Washington is the highest peak in the White Mountains of New Hampshire—and in the Northeast—and is therefore a very popular attraction for RVers and other sightseers and hikers. As a result the most widely used trails can be quite crowded, and however you climb the summit will have crowds, many having come up by the Cog Railway or the Auto Road. Mount Washington Cog Railway The beauty of the mountains and the thrill of ascending the Northeast’s highest peak are just as enchanting today as they were in 1869, when... [Read more...]

Inscription Rock: El Morro National Monument

June 13, 2013 by · 2 Comments 

Inscription Rock: El Morro National Monument

“Paso por aqui, el adelantado Don Juan de Oñate, del descubrimiento de la mar del sur a 16 de Abril de 1605.” El Morro is Spanish for headland or bluff. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Translated, the inscription proclaims: “Passed by here, the expedition leader Don Juan de Oñate, from the discovery of the Sea of the South the 16th of April of 1605.” While Oñate’s inscription is the oldest Spanish carving found on El Morro, he was not the first Spaniard to see the mesa. In March 1583, Diego Pérez de Luxan, chronicler of an exploring expedition led by Antonio de Espejo, recorded in his journal that the party had camped at a location he called El Estanque de Peñol (The Place at the Great Rock). However, no record of the expedition’s passing has been found on the mesa. People had been carving messages on Inscription Rock in the high desert of northwestern New Mexico for centuries before de Oñate, the first Spanish Conquistador to organize a colony in New Mexico, came... [Read more...]

Joys of a Texas Bucket List

June 6, 2013 by · 2 Comments 

Joys of a Texas Bucket List

Texas is big and brawny in every way, a state brimming with natural assets. Whether visiting rugged mountains, sandy beaches, wild canyons, or the piney woods, the “Lone Star State” pleases travelers in a million wonderful ways. After leaving the pool, spring waters ebb slowly through the cattails, rushes and reeds of San Solomon Cienega. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved Our Texas RV Travel Bucket List continues. Balmorhea State Park Balmorhea State Park is located on less than 50 acres in the foothills of the Davis Mountains. For thousands of years San Solomon Springs has provided a cool, wet respite for anyone who happened by this desert oasis. The pool as it now stands was built in the mid-1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and holds more than 3,500,000 gallons of clear spring water with a constant temperature of 72 to 76 degrees. The pool covers 1.75 acres and reaches depths of 25 feet, making it a mecca for desert-bound scuba divers. The huge pool is fed by the springs... [Read more...]

Digital Photography and RVing: A Natural Fit

March 9, 2013 by · 1 Comment 

Digital Photography and RVing: A Natural Fit

The only thing better than ‘right now’ will someday be the memories of right now! Digital is not difficult to shoot and good results are achievable, but one must know the basics of photography as the fundamentals remain the same, irrespective of the recording medium. Pictured above is Spider Rock in Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved You’ve probably an RVer because you love to travel, you want to see the natural and manmade wonders of North America, or you just don’t like being tied down to one place. Whatever the reason, are you keeping a visual record of your RV travels? Do you take photos of your RV memories? If not, why not? Traveling in an RV allows us to move at a slower pace, which gives us a chance to see things that often times go unnoticed. RVing gives us an opportunity to get closer to and experience the beauty of nature. In addition to hiking, biking, boating, nature study, and birding; photography is a natural activity to... [Read more...]

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